Casey Kelbaugh, Founder, Slideluck

Casey Kelbaugh is founder of Slideluck, a major arts non-profit, and New York Times photographer. He's a trove of industry advice and management expertise, having built Slideluck from a small gathering to watch art on a big screen to an international phenomenon. 

About Slideluck, Casey offers "people sit down and we watch this thing together, experience it together and there’s something powerful about the collective experience. People get emotionally charged and walk away changed." 

You can get Casey's take on your projects and career at doer.expert/caseykelbaugh. To get you thinking, we've collected a few favorite gems of industry wisdom from Casey here:

  • "you should be sending out your promos, newsletters, etc. but I believe the one way to define yourself as a photographer is to work on long-term personal projects. Think in terms of discrete projects and series. It tends to be sequences of images that get published in magazines or shown at museums. This in turn can lead to bigger paying commercial work."
  • Japanese Sumi-e painting is "a matter of mastering one brushstroke until you could move on to the next. You had to be methodical and exact. I applied these lessons to my photography. I started with a 50mm lens and learned very systematically."
  • "If you decide to be repped then you need to stand out from everyone else the agency has on their roster. You have to be different so that the reps are motivated to push your work forward . . . I was once the only commercial photographer at an agency that otherwise had war photographers - my work offered an unique creative perspective, and this led to quite a bit of work."
  • "The camera allows you into incredible places to meet with amazing people. The camera is access, which I think is the most exciting part of the job."

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Photo by Bill Wadman.

Photo by Bill Wadman.

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